Long Tailed Tit, Aegithalos caudatus

Other Names: A Northamptonshire name is Bag, probably referring to the shape of the nest. Gloucestershire and Shropshire use Poke Bag. Poke and Bag have the same meaning.
Long Pod is used from Surrey to Somerset. Long-tailed Titmouse, and many others have been used. Also Barrel Tit for its nest, Bum Barrel and Bottle Tit. Bottle Jug (Yorkshire) and Bush Oven in Norfolk. Creak Mouse (Gloucestershire) possibly from its sharp call.
Habitat: Often found at the edge of deciduous woodland, in bushier places such as hedgerows and scrub. Can be seen in gardens and parks.
Distribution:
Worldwide: Across Europe throughout the year, with the exception of Iceland and northern Scandinavia.
UK:Most of the British Isles where there is suitable habitat.
Numbers:
Worldwide:
Estimated between 30.6 – 144 million including China.
U.K.: 340,000 territories

Food: Insects, occasionally seeds in autumn and winter, the insects mostly arthropods, esp bugs and eggs, larvae of butterflies/moths.
Breeding: 8 – 12 white eggs in a domed nest bound with cobwebs, built into a bramble thicket or bush.
Bill: Stumpy Seedeater beak.
Length: 14 – 15 cm.
Wingspan: 17 – 19 cm

It’s the call followed by the flitting black and white streamers through a bush or within the tree tops, that highlight the beauty of these active Long tailed titmouse, at a distant the black and white plumage gives them good camouflage among the branches, get your binoculars onto them and you will see the full grace of design in the plumage and when in breeding condition that rose pink colour that seems to subtly glow though the feathers from the background of their body through to their outer plumage.
The thing that they are generally know for is the nest that of a ball of feathers, both the male and female working together takes them nearly three weeks at the beginning of the breeding season to complete the nest later in the season when time is of the essence they can complete it in less than a week, the nest will be built in a bush or fork of a tree, shaped like a bottle with usually a roof and entrance hole near the top whilst made from moss, interwoven with cobwebs and with lichen attached for camouflaged, then being lined to keep the eggs and chicks safe with feathers, with well over 1000 and even reports of 10,000 in some texts, these are picked up from around their territory, and any bird corpses found would made the fine a gold mine for them.
The young stay with their parents during the winter months and can be found in flocks of twenty or more searching through the trees in winter.

Long Tail Tits Long Tail Tit
Watercolour
Griff
Long Tail Tit,
photo
P. Cumberland
Artist Sam Harvey Artist Griff Contact us for license use

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