Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
This male Red Breasted Flycatcher, Ficedula parva was found on the 28th October 2014 at about 2 p.m. by myself having seen a number of people in front of a copse of Hawthorn just pass the Beechy Head pub whilst travelling towards Brighton,


When we pulled up in the layby, it showed itself within 5 minutes, so I went to were the others were observing the bird to get a few photographs. The bird was constantly on the move travelling from the middle of the copse to the right hand side looking from the road, it tended to favour a few perches and allowed me to slowly move closer each time it left before returning again allowing me to get to within 15-20 ft of this Flycatcher without it showing any stress. It even took flights towards me to capture the air bound insects, which it was feeding on. The problem for photos was it generally perched at a new location from its take off perch.
Late the following day in heavy fog and rain I could not see the bird and no one else was there.

Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
One of the birds favoured perches within a hawthorn bush that enabled it to launch an attact on its prey.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
This picture shows the birds cocked tail and its white undertail
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
A front view showing the red breast of the male bird, note just below the beak unlike the Robin being above the beak and covering a larger area. .
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
The Breast, eye and tail are all showing on this image, its key I.D. features.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
A poor flight shot, the shutter speed was to slow, but it does show a white underwing.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
A rear view, easily taken as a Robin but notice the dark tail.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
A classic side view of the Red Breasted Flycatcher
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
This photograph has highlighted the black legs and feet, having no blacklight in the photo
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
The R.B.Flycatcher is in the center of the image to the rear of the bush, can you see it?
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
As the bird looked in its natural setting, simular to my first sighting of this bird.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
Ficedula parva, a Red Breasted Flycatcher, females lack the bright red breast of this male.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
The bird was nicely in the open hear but the branch had the wrong curve on it for an ideal photography, I could have done with being on the opposite side.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
The bird was above me here but it does show its while undertail.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
Face on with the birds red breast, lined with that soft grey as the Robin again.
Red-Breasted-Flycatcher
This is the twitch site a small copse of hawthorn bushes, with a number of Birdwatchers awaiting the bird to show. The edge of the seven sisters is in the horizon. On the left you can see the bonnet of a car parked in the layby.


One person there asked if this bird would survive, as it was off course, we can only hope it left before the weather set in and got back on track otherwise it was doomed to die, but then without two off course birds we would have no expansion of a birds range, the problem is if it survives and produces a hybrid with some bodies, but I say if that hybrid was fertile it could change possible to the good its partners gene pool.


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